Bookreviews | Author: Muhaddisa Dhalla

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Bookreviews | Author: Muhaddisa Dhalla

Postby abuali » 23 Oct 2006, 02:29

This forum is dedicated to discussions related to the 'Bookreviews'' section of each issue. This section shall be the responsibility ofMuhaddisa.

Muhaddisa: Please put forward your ideas and topics for next two issues and anything else that you want to share in relation to the 'Bookreviews' section.
Shabnam
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Postby Shabnam » 18 Nov 2006, 20:25

Salams Md,

I was just looking through some magazines, n looking into the book review section... I liked this idea for each book review there was a picture of the cover and also in another magazine the book was turned upside down... which is quite gud as well...

Think about it

Shabu
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Postby Umm.aly » 18 Nov 2006, 21:08

A/s.. yeah i think its the norm neh tht along with the book review a pic of the book is shown.. but hey! thnks for jogging my memory :)

Also wanted to clarify that we are dng Islamic books right? Any suggestions?
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Postby abuali » 19 Nov 2006, 11:51

Yes...We should promote islamic books...which are normally misunderstood as boring blah blahs.

We should also have a standard rating system...

Say:

Content:
Language:
Graphics:
References:
Reader-friendly:
Overall:

Just a few suggestions...each category above and more...can be given a maximum 5 stars (or question marks?) to give the reader a quick guide..
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Postby abuali » 19 Nov 2006, 11:52

upside down idea is good shabnam
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Postby Muhammad Mahdi » 07 Mar 2007, 17:04

BOOK REVIEW: Islam and Religious Pluralism



By Ayatollah Murtadha Mutahhari
Translated by Sayyid Sulayman Ali Hasan
Foreword by Hasnain Walji with an Introduction by Sayyid Muhammad Rizvi
Islamic Publishing House
ISBN 0-9733622-2-7



Have you ever wondered what would happen to the non-Muslims, who have led decent lives and/or contributed greatly to humanity in one way or the other? Are they going to go to hell because they were not Muslims? If you have been plagued with these questions or similar ones, then this book is a must read for you. Here’s why…

Islam and Religious Pluralism is actually a section of another book by Ayatollah Mutahhari entitled, ‘Adl-e Illahi (The Divine Justice) under the chapter heading, “Good Deeds of Non-Muslims.”

The book begins with a Foreword, which is short, and to the point, followed by an Introduction that is rather lengthy, but worth a read. The biography of the great scholar is very touching with just a brief glimpse into the life of the author and his various experiences that contributed to the makings of great books, which are his legacy for us today. Even his martyrdom at the hands of those who opposed his quest for modern Islamic revival shows the greatness that was Murtadha Mutahhari.

The rest of the book proves to be a thoroughly absorbing read, whereby a high level of concentration may be required in order to absorb the true essence of the book. The language gets a little heavy once in a while, but nothing that a handy dictionary cannot handle.

The discussion is based on 5 categories of believers;

1. The non-Muslims and the unbelievers i.e. the polytheists and atheists
2. The Ahlal Kitab
3. The Muslims in general who have differing levels of belief
4. The non-Shia; and
5. The Shia who follow the Ahlul Bayt (a.s)



The author presents the various opposing views that are found, before describing the above groups. By giving a general background of what we are up against, it helps later on to understand the answers that are presented by the author later on in the book.

Mutahhari identifies 2 ways of thinking generally found:

1. The people who believe that a good deed is a good deed no matter who does it. In the eyes of Allah (s.w.t), everyone is equal, thus there is no distinction as such between a Muslim and a non-Muslim, a believer and a non-believer. The good deed will be rewarded, as a bad deed would be punished equally, regardless of who does it.



2. The other group is what the author termed as the ‘Rigid Group’. This group is in total opposition with the above group. To quote the author “They say that it is impossible for a non-Muslim’s actions to be accepted. The actions of unbelievers and similarly those of non-Shi’a Muslims have absolutely no value.”

Another argument presented by the group is that if God accepted the deeds of non-Muslims, what would be the advantage of being Muslim? What is the use of performing all of those extra compulsory deeds like praying, fasting etc, if God were to accept the deeds of some one who doesn’t perform all these deeds and neither does he even believe in Him!

Mutahhari answers the arguments in a way that leaves the reader spell bound and eager to go on reading because it just gets better and better!

He says that belief is important in respect of the deed being performed, however there are exceptions like the ignorant and the unaware people – all of whom are explained in detail with relevant Quranic ayats supporting the statements made.

Though these individuals might not be punished for their ignorance, this does not mean that their religions are completely truthful or valid. Here, Mutahhari makes it clear that Islam is indeed the true religion revealed from God.

Another interesting concept that comes up is that a non-Muslim could be better if he were to have been exposed to the most complete form of truth in God’s religion, rather than the partial light to which he or she is currently exposed. Mutahhari talks about the program of Islam generally, and specifically the guidance of the Shi’a, as God’s most perfect set of life-instructions

The flow of one topic into the other, as well as the arguments with its subsequent answers has been presented excellently. Many a times you will find yourself nodding your head in agreement with the author or shaking your head in amazement as a conclusion is brought to an argument.

A highly recommended read! ★★★★☆ (4/5)

(editing done)
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Re: Bookreviews | Author: Muhaddisa Dhalla

Postby Muhammad Mahdi » 03 May 2008, 19:28

The Awaited Saviour

By:

Ayatullah Syed Muhammad Baqir al Sadr

Ayatullah Murtaza Mutahhari





This book is divided into 2 parts, The Awaited Saviour by Ayatullah Baqir al Sadr and The Saviours Revolution by Ayatullah Murtaza Mutahhari. It’s a brief article like collection written by the respected scholars on the subject of Imam Mahdi’s (ATFS) occultation and reappearance (may Allah hasten it).

It’s a pretty old book, the copy that I have is dated back to 1979, and some of the arguments based on the authors’ scientific knowledge are pretty historical for our times. Nonetheless, they are quite logical even for current reading. Here’s a brief summary and rating.



Addressed are pertinent questions that have arose before and may continue to do so, with regards to the existence and re-appearance of The Mahdi (a.s); in not only the non-Muslims mind, but in Muslim thoughts as well.

Issues such as the possibility of having such a long life; or the fact that the Imam could have appeared long before, due to the many oppressions and injustice seen in the world so far; and even the question with regards to how it is possible for one man to save the entire world and bring into place a universal government.



The answers to the above questions and many others posed are backed both by scientific reasoning and Islamic ideologies. In some cases, even historical studies and cultural trends have been utilised to form some formidable arguments and conclusions about The Mahdi. Mutahhari has perhaps written a little more about human nature studies to relate it to society’s anticipation for a saviour.

It’s a short compilation but the message that reaches the reader is much thought provoking and at times, convincing. It sparks off the interest to re-examine the current world around us today from the point of view of the one who awaits The Mahdi. For those of us who have non-muslim friends who may be curious about our faith in our Imam, this is a good book to recommend!

On the down side, the science terminologies and theories can get a person to skip some texts, and having to go back and re-read them due to its reference in later paragraphs. Sometimes the English gets a little complicated as well. Being just a short compilation, the authors have been restricted to a minimal presentation. Certain points which would have been better elaborated with the line of thoughts that was being followed have been briefly summarized.
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